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Andrei Gritsan

Research opportunities for students


Research opportunities for undergraduate students

Information about the JHU Undergraduate School in Physics and Astronomy.

There are exciting opportunities for undergraduate students of all levels to participate in Experimental Particle Physics research. Contact Prof. Gritsan for further details. There is an option of conducting research for academic credit.

Provost's Undergraduate Research Award or Dean's Undergraduate Research Award are excellent opportunities to conduct research projects. Recently three students who worked with Prof. Gritsan received the awards: Manisha Narayanan, an undergraduate student at JHU, was awarded the Provost's Undergraduate Research Award in the 2010-2011 academic years (see the article " Hadron collisions reach out to people in Washington" in CMS Times); Heshy Roskes, an undergraduate student at JHU, was awarded the Dean's Undergraduate Research Award in the 2013-2014 academic years (see the article " Heshy Roskes ’14: Smashing Particles" in JHU Arts and Sciences magazine); and Jered McInerney, an undergraduate student at JHU, was awarded the Provost's Undergraduate Research Award in the 2016-2017 academic years.

The projects are to learn and apply data analysis techniques on the CMS high-energy physics experiment on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) or/and to develop outreach projects which communicate LHC results to the public. Technical aspects of the data analysis work involve modern computer applications in high energy physics. Some experience with modern computer languages and operating systems (e.g. UNIX/C++) is desired but not required. See discussion of the projects for the graduate students.


Research opportunities for graduate students

Information about the JHU Graduate School in Physics and Astronomy.

An overview of research activities is given here. Learn physics analysis techniques in frontier particle physics and work with silicon tracking detectors.

Get involved in analysis of the CMS data studying the properties of a new discovered Higgs boson and/or search for new related phenomena. Perform Monte Carlo modeling and LHC data analysis in search for new fundamental particles and interactions. Also learn both hardware and software requirements on alignment of the silicon tracking detectors on the CMS experiment. Technical aspects of the work involve modern computer applications in high energy physics:

- UNIX (Linux) operating system
- C/C++/Python programming languages
- ROOT Data Analysis Framework, based on C++
- CMS Reconstruction software

Some experience with some of the above items (UNIX/C++) is desired. Course in Elementary Particle Physics (171.625) is recommended but not required. You can read more about the CMS experiment.


Recent Ph.D. JHU graduates who worked with Prof. Gritsan:

Candice You (Ph.D. 2017)
Higgs boson properties and search for additonal resonances

Chris Martin (Ph.D. 2015)
Discovery and Characterization of a Higgs boson using four-lepton events from the CMS experiment

Ian Anderson (Ph.D. 2015)
A Tale of Two Vertices: Production and Decay of the Higgs VV Vertex at the LHC

Andrew Whitbeck (Ph.D. 2013)
Discovery and Characterization of a Higgs-like Resonance Using the Matrix Element Likelihood Approach

Nhan Tran (Ph.D. 2011)
Angles and Daemons: Spin Correlations at the LHC

Yanyan Gao (Ph.D. 2009)
Study of rare gluonic penguin decays B to phi K pi (pi) at BABAR